Are you ready to search for courses or training?
Level:
Major:
Search By Keyword:
Interest in and use of botanicals and herbal preparations as alternatives for pharmaceuticals have exploded in recent years. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 4 billion people, amounting to 80 percent of the world’s population, use herbal medicine for some aspect of primary health care. Herbal medicine is a major component in all indigenous people’s traditional medicine.

Interest in and use of botanicals and herbal preparations as alternatives for pharmaceuticals have exploded in recent years. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 4 billion people, amounting to 80 percent of the world’s population, use herbal medicine for some aspect of primary health care. Herbal medicine is a major component in all indigenous people’s traditional medicine. This class provides a detailed botanical overview of the herbs, including information on its medicinal parts. The students also can learn about the actions and pharmacology (including the compounds and their effects), contraindications, precautions and adverse reactions, dosage information, and a complete list of literature citations. Students will also be taught about traditional Persian herbal preparations highly dependent on a variety of factors such as cultivation and harvesting conditions, the specific parts of the plant to be processed and so on. Herbal medicines are preparations derived from naturally occurring plants with medicinal or preventive properties. At the end of the course, students are able to identify the apparent characteristics of herbs and their pharmacological properties. Additionally, according to patient disorders and the nature of medicinal herbs, they can provide the most useful traditional herbal formulations to cure various diseases.

Interest in and usa of botanicals and herbal preparations as alternatives to pharmaceuticals have exploded in recent years. This class provides a detailed botanical overview of the herbs, including information on its medicinal parts; flower and fruit; leaves, stem, and root; unique characteristics, production, related plants, and additional common names and synonyms. Medicinal plants have been identified and used throughout human history. Medicinal properties derived from plants can come from many different parts of a plant including leaves, roots, bark, fruit, seeds, and  flowers. The different parts of plants can contain different active ingredients within one plant. Thus, one part of the plant could be toxic while another portion of the same plant could be harmless. Chemical compounds in plants mediate their effects on the human body through processes identical to those already well understood for the chemical compounds in conventional drugs; thus herbal medicines do not differ greatly from conventional drugs in terms of how they work. All plants produce chemical compounds as part of their normal metabolic activities. In this course of study, students also study about the traditional formulations of botanicals. There are many forms in which herbs can be administered, the most common of which is in the form of a liquid that is drunk by the patient, either a herbal tea or a (possibly diluted) plant extract. Whole herb consumption is also practiced either fresh, in dried form or as fresh juice. Infusions are hot water extracted of herbs such as chamomile or mint through steeping. Decoctions are the long-term boiled extracts, usually of harder substances like roots or bark. Maceration is the old infusion of plants with high mucilage-content such as sage, thyme, etc. To make macerates, plants are chopped and added to cold water. They are then left to stand for 7 to 12 hours (depending on herb used). For most macerates, it takes 10 hours. Herbal elixirs are alcoholic extract of herbs, usually with an ethanol percentage of 12-38%. Extracts include liquid extracts, dry extracts, and nebulisates. Liquid extracts are liquids with a lower ethanol percentage than tinctures. They are usually made by vacuum distilling tinctures. Dry extracts are extracts of plant material that are evaporated into a dry mass. They can then be further refined to a capsule or tablet.  A nebulisate is a dry extract created by freeze-drying. Vinegars are prepared in the same way as tinctures, except using a solution of acetic acid as the solvent. Syrups are extracts of herbs made with syrup or honey. Sixty-five parts of sugar are mixed with thirty-five parts of water and herb. The whole is then boiled and macerated for three weeks. Many herbs are applied topically to the skin in a variety of forms. Essential oil extracts can be applied to the skin, usually diluted in carrier oil. Many essential oils can burn the skin or are simply too high dose used straight; therefore, diluting them in olive oil or food grade oil such as almond oil can allow these to be used safely. Salves, oils, balms, creams and lotions are other forms of topical delivery mechanisms. Most topical applications are oil extractions of herbs. Taking a food grade oil and soaking herbs in it for anywhere from weeks to months allows certain phytochemicals to be extracted into the oil. This oil can then be made into salves, creams, lotions, or simply used as oil for topical applications. Many massage oils, antibacterial salves, and wound healing compounds are made this way. One can also make a poultice or compress using the whole herb or the appropriate part of the plant, which is usually crushed or dried and re-hydrated with a small amount of water and then applied directly in a bandage or cloth. Inhalation, as in aromatherapy, can be used as a mood changing treatment. To fight a sinus infection or cough or to cleanse the skin on a deeper level (steam rather than direct inhalation here) is useful. These materials are, in fact, the examples of subjects that will be discussed in this course of study.

 

Regular Teaching Subjects
(Short term Course for 50 hours)

•Description: This class provides a detailed botanical overview of the herb. (Theoretical and practical)
•Actions and Pharmacology: Here you will find data on the active compounds or heterogeneous mixtures found in the plant, followed by a summary of the herbs’ clinical effects. If various parts of the plant possess different pharmacological activity, the parts are discussed here individually. (Theoretical)
•Indications and Usage: Information on the uses of the herb is studied in this part. (Theoretical)
•Contraindications: Although most natural remedies can be used under all medical circumstances, a few pharmacologically potent herbs must be avoided in the presence of certain medical conditions. If any such contraindications exist, they are summarized here. (Theoretical)
• Precautions and Adverse Reactions: Found in this section are any cautions or special considerations regarding safe use of the herb including any restrictions on use in pregnancy or childhood. Although most herbal remedies are notably free of known side effects, any reported in the available literature are noted here. (Theoretical)
• Traditional formulations of botanicals (Theoretical and practical)

 


Basic Information:
Program Type: Non-Degree Based
Level Of study: Short-Term Course
School / Faculty: Persian and Complementary Medicine
Department: Persian Pharmacy
Major (Name Of Program): Materia Medica and Traditional Persian Drug Dosage Forms
This program contact information:
Telephone: 0098- 51- 38552189
Fax: 0098- 51- 38535980
Mobile: 0098- 9151110785
Email Address: Salarir@mums.ac.ir
Address: School of Persian and Complementary Medicine, Eastern Razi street, next to ebn-e-sina hospital, Mashhad, Iran.
Contact Person Name: Dr Roshanak Salari
Program Detail:
Length of Training:

50 hrs

Language Requirement:

Persian/English

Admission Requirement:

BSc in medical Fields, Fluency in English and Persian

InstagramGoogle+LinkedInRSS Feed
Stay connected, follow our newsletter!
Email Address: